WAGIC is a dedicated space for discussing gender, sexuality and feminism(s) in China past and present

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

March 30, 2018

Destiny was not anatomy. Before the twentieth century, men and women in China rarely pleaded their social division based on biological “facts” alone. This began to change circa 1900, when the concept of sex slowly entered the Chinese lexicon. Already in the Self-Strengthening movement (1861–1895), when the urban center of Chinese culture and society relocated from the heartland to the shore, missionary doctors dedicated themse...

This year, the New Hall Art Collection, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge, UK and the Asia Art Archive launched their exciting new research on women and art in Hong Kong, which combines quantitative data and the experiences of women artists working in the region. WAGIC asked Eliza Gluckman of the New Hall Art Collection and independent researcher Phoebe Wong to share some background about their research process a...

March 28, 2018

A more than 300-year history of women’s quest for a place of their own; a history of evolving professionalization of female authority figures representing the interests of their women constituencies; a history of coming-to-voice that is a collective rather than merely individual phenomenon and an assertive movement that lays claim to a well-founded place in history and builds on this continuity a claim to future relevance … mu...

March 27, 2018

Yu Xiuhua (born 1976) is one of China’s leading and most widely read poets today. She has been described as ‘China’s Emily Dickinson’, though Yu herself is less than enthusiastic about the label.

Born and raised in a rural village in Hubei Province, Yu dropped out of high school a year before graduation.  It wasn’t until her late 20s that she wrote her first poem, entitled 'Imprint' (印痕).

In 2014 Yu became an overnight Inte...

March 26, 2018

Before the founding of the socialist state in 1949, only one woman director was recorded in Chinese film history: Xie Caizhen, who made her single film, An Orphan’s Cry (Guchu beisheng), in 1925. Unfortunately this film is no longer available to watch. The enforcement of gender equality after 1949 by the CCP ensured women’s participation in the film industry. During the 1950s and 1960s, women directors such as Wang Ping, Wang...

March 21, 2018

From its inception, China’s socialist state defined gender equality primarily as women’s right to equal work and equal pay. Women’s liberation was understood as full participation in paid, public work. To achieve this end, women were to be emancipated from domestic drudgery, and pregnant women and young mothers were to enjoy state protection so that they could combine the raising of children with productive work. Issues of con...

March 19, 2018

The Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) has long been characterised as a period of “gender erasure”. Indeed, many researchers have argued that gender and sexuality were completely erased from Chinese society during this time in the name of equality between the sexes and the proletarianization of the masses. Into this void, Chairman Mao’s slogan “the times have changed, men and women are the same” was propagated as a powerf...

March 14, 2018

In June 1907, He-Yin Zhen (何殷震) wrote a “Feminist Manifesto” [女子宣布书; nvzi xuanbu shu] that served as the lead editorial for the new journal, Natural Justice (Tianyi, 天义),  she and her husband, Liu Shipei (刘师培), were just launching. The Chinese journal, published in exile in Tokyo, was the mouthpiece of the Society for the Restoration of Women’s Rights, an organization intended to intervene politically, intellectually, and soci...

March 12, 2018

The women’s suffrage activists in China faced similar challenges to their sister suffragettes around the world—including, whether or not to use violence to press their case and if so, how much? China’s women’s suffrage campaign grew out of an explicitly violent struggle—the rebellion aimed at overthrowing the Qing dynasty in 1911. The core women’s suffrage activists were all members of Sun Yat-sen’s (1866-1925) Revolutionary A...

March 10, 2018

On February 16th 2018, WAGIC podcast presenter Yuan Ren published an opinion piece in The Guardian entitled “Traditional Chinese new year is changing – and the UK needs to catch up.”

We would first like to clarify that Yuan wrote the piece in her capacity as a freelance journalist and not in any way on behalf of WAGIC. However, because of her affiliation with WAGIC, we feel that this also reflects on who we are and would like t...

Please reload

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now